Photo by Cory Weaver

Photo by Cory Weaver

 Photo by Mark Kiryluk

Photo by Mark Kiryluk

 Photo by Liz Lauren

Photo by Liz Lauren

 Photo by Sarah Cohn

Photo by Sarah Cohn

 Photo by Liz Lauren

Photo by Liz Lauren

 

Praise for Paul La Rosa

 

Especially noteworthy is Paul LaRosa’s rich, honest, natural-sounding baritone: Already in Act I his Falke caught attention for its wry sophistication, his voice and his overall countenance settling into the role immediately.
- Paul Horsley (KC Independent)

As her sometime lover. El Payador, trapping and handsome Paul La Rosa sings with a burnished throbbing tone of considerable beauty, and earns his Barihunk credentials in a steamy bedroom encounter with Maria.
-James Sohre (OperaToday.com)

It's hard to imagine better casting for the boxer Ochsenschwantz than baritone Paul La Rosa, healthy of voice, in great shape and a good comedian.
- David Shengold (Opera News Online)

The robust baritone Paul LaRosa is wonderful as the nimble-footed heavyweight duped by his wife
- Anthony Tommasini (NYTimes)

Baritone Paul La Rosa's bodacious voice and commanding personality perfectly complemented the energetic and competitive role of the Payador.
-Alison Kaufman (The Register Guard)

Let no one think just any baritone can handle the cossack kicks that Ryan Center baritone Paul LaRosa pulled off as Boris, the charmer who’s determined to lure the total girl+apartment package. He’s something of the total package himself, with a wonderful touch for physical comedy, a strong and beautiful voice and the dancing skills that one typically encounters on Broadway but not so much in the opera house.
- Nancy Malitz (Chicagoontheaisle)

Sara Heaton and Paul LaRosa sang their hearts out — and fielded a sparkling dance number worthy of Fred and Ginger — as the central romantic couple, Lidochka and Boris.
- Mark Thomas Ketterson (Opera News)

In the role of Jud Fry, Lyric veteran Paul La Rosa was engaging and made the obsessive character approachable, using his full bass-baritone to great effect in “Poor Jud Is Dead.”
- Seen and Heard International

Fry (masterfully played in the performance I saw by understudy Paul La Rosa)
- Menachem Wecker – ChicagoNow

Paul LaRosa portrays Jud, the farmhand whose desire for Laurey is a bit untoward. LaRosa's quite handsome, which gives Jud's private proclivities an added psychological edge. 
- Lisa Kennedy – Denver Post

Paul La Rosa effectively doubled as a tremulous First Officer, then an unrelentingly determined Rambo, pinging his powerful baritone off the back wall. And, strapping in his wife beater tee shirt, Mr. La Rosa also managed to out-Gunn Nathan in the Muscles Parade.                                                                                                  -James Sohre (Opera Today)

Baritone Paul La Rosa generated authentic theatrical thrills, hurling accusations at Pallesen's Klinghoffer as if the entire Arab–Israeli conflict were embodied in these two individuals.
- Joshua Rosenblum (Opera News Online) 

Paul La Rosa has the gifts of a gorgeous low-baritone voice and a charming stage presence.  The show-off part of Dandini fits him like a glove.  He is a delightful performer.
- John Bender (San Francisco Classical Voice)

Paul La Rosa, as Dandini, was probably my fave, but that role is just too good so he was at an advantage.  He has a great voice and just had the timing down perfectly for the comic stuff.
- oboeinsight.com

Paul La Rosa was smooth, velvety and full of charm.
- sfist

Handily dispatching Ford's coloratura figure preceding his Act Two, Scene One duet with Falstaff, Paul LaRosa soon boiled over with jealous rage, polished baritone sound pouring out of him, in his monologue "È sogno? o realtà?," the full-fledged dramatic aria embedded in this comic opera.
- Bruce-Michael Gelbert (QOnstage.com)

the powerfully resonant Junius of Paul LaRosa
- Charles T. Downey (Washington Post) 

Tall, dashing and swaggering, La Rosa proved every inch a Figaro.  He is the lucky owner of a smooth baritone with plenty of power behind it, and he spit out the Italian words so that each registered.
- Andrew L. Pincus (The Berkshire Eagle) 

Baritone Paul La Rosa vocally distinguished  his every appearance, whether as Mozart’s Guglielmo (in a selection from Cosi fan tutte) or Gian Carlo Menotti’s Melchior (in Amahl and the Night Visitors) or even as a mere officer (in the Meyebeer).
- James Keolker (San Francisco Classical Voice)

Juilliard graduate Paul LaRosa, who held the audience in the palm of his hand with beautiful performances of Wagner's Wolfram and Silvio from Pagliacci.  He will be surely someone to be reckoned with.
- Brian Dickie